Tips For Your Wedding MC

As a busy wedding DJ I get the opportunity to MC about half a dozen weddings a year, but most often the Bride & Groom have asked a friend or family member to fill the role for the evening. When I ask them what criteria they’ve used to select the MC most often they come back with some variation of “He’s done it before” or “He’s really funny and outgoing and everybody loves him”.  Sometimes this turns out really well and other times, not so much. Here are a few tips you can pass along to your MC to ensure they have success in their role.

Take Charge. The Bride & Groom have enough on their plate without having to host the reception themselves. They’ve probably chosen you because you have a reputation for keeping things under control. Your job is to preside over the reception and lead everyone through the formalities as they happen.

Develop an agenda for the day. The Bride & Groom will probably have a lot of input as they’ve spent countless hours planning and coordinating the day.  Build a timeline together that will allow you to step through the various stages of the reception without anything feeling rushed or too spread out.

Communicate. A big part of being a successful MC isn’t done with a microphone. Before starting into anything that requires the input of someone else make sure they know what is coming and that they are prepared. Before announcing dinner make sure the kitchen is ready to serve. Give photographers or videographers a couple of minutes warning that an important event is coming so that they can set up their shots and properly capture the moment. If music is necessary or planned make sure the DJ has the songs cued up and ready to go.

Develop a script. The best MCs use a script while they’re hosting and stick to it. You don’t have to write out what you’re going to say word for word, but before you step up to the microphone and speak you should have a pretty good idea of what you’re going to say and how you’re going to say it.

Know your audience. Some families are quite conservative, while others are not, but most often we have a mixture of both. Keep this in mind when developing your script and know what type of humor and stories are appropriate. Those college road trip stories might be best left for the bachelor party!

Rehearse. Rehearse in front of the mirror. Rehearse in front of the dog. Rehearse in the car. Rehearse in the shower. Rehearse in front of your wife. Just rehearse! The better you know the material the more comfortable you’ll be when it comes time to perform.

Be Yourself. You’ve been asked to do this job because of who you are – so don’t try to be someone you’re not. If you’re not the kind of person who is comfortable making jokes, don’t try to use a lot of humor. You’re not going to be Conan O’Brien or Jay Leno, so just stay yourself!

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